Office Consultations

When you arrive for your scheduled consultation with Dr. Reich, you will check in with our front office staff. You will need to complete some paperwork, including a medical history. 

Your consultation with the physician will be approximately 20-30 minutes and may also include an examination.

What to bring to your appointment:

  • Your insurance card
  • Physician referral forms if required by your insurance company
  • A list of prescriptions and/or over the counter medications, including dose and frequency, that you are taking
  • Information about your medical and surgical history
  • Your co-payment if required by your insurance company
  • Copies of recent tests, imaging reports (x-rays, CAT Scans), past procedure reports or anything you want Dr. Reich to review during your appointment


Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy allows Dr. Reich to look into your entire large intestine, from the lowest part, the rectum, to the lower end of the small intestine. The procedure is used to detect polyps (pre-cancerous growths), colon cancer and other causes of rectal bleeding or abnormal bowel habits. A preparation process is required prior to the procedure to cleanse the colon.

During the procedure, you will lie on your left side on the examination table. You will be given a sedative by a board-certified anesthesiologist to keep you comfortable and help you relax during the examination. Dr. Reich will insert a long, flexible lighted tube, called a colonoscope, into your rectum and guide it into your colon. The images are projected onto to a video screen. The scope also blows air into your colon to inflate the colon and give the physician a clearer view of the area.

If anything unusual is found, like a polyp (a potentially pre-cancerous growth), Dr. Reich  can remove a piece of it or all of it using tiny instruments passed through the scope. That tissue is then sent to a lab for testing. If there is bleeding, Dr. Reich can pass special probes or inject special medicines through the scope to stop the bleeding.

The procedure takes 15 to 30 minutes. You will need to remain for a short time after the procedure until the medication wears off.
Bleeding and perforation of the colon are possible complications of this procedure; however, such complications are rare.

Upper Endoscopy

Upper endoscopy (also known as gastroscopy or EGD), allows Dr. Reich to examine the lining of the upper part of your gastrointestinal tract. This test allows Dr. Reich to evaluate symptoms of persistent upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or difficulty swallowing. It is the best test for finding the cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract.

During the procedure, you will lie on your left side on the examination table. You will be given a sedative by a board-certified anesthesiologist to keep you comfortable and help you relax during the examination. Dr. Reich will insert a long, flexible lighted tube, called an endoscope, through your mouth and into the esophagus. The endoscope does not interfere with your breathing.

If anything unusual is found, like a polyp (a potentially pre-cancerous growth), Dr. Reich can remove a piece of it or all of it using tiny instruments passed through the scope. That tissue is then sent to a lab for testing. If there is bleeding, Dr. Reich can pass special probes or inject special medicines through the scope to stop the bleeding.

The procedure takes five to ten minutes. You will need to remain for a short time after the procedure until the medication wears off.
Bleeding is a possible complication of this procedure; however, this is rare.

Sigmoidoscopy

Sigmoidoscopy enables Dr. Reich to look at the inside of the large intestine from the rectum to approximately one third of the way around the colon. This procedure is used to find the cause of bleeding, diarrhea, abdominal pain or constipation and early signs of cancer in the colon and rectum. This procedure enables Dr. Reich to see bleeding, inflammation, abnormal growths and ulcers. A preparation prior to the procedure is required.

During the procedure, you will lie on your left side on the examination table. Dr. Reich will insert a short flexible lighted tube, a sigmoidoscope, into your rectum and guide it about a third of the way around the colon. The images are projected onto to a video screen. The scope also blows air into your colon to inflate the colon and give Dr. Reich a clearer view of the area. You may feel some pressure and cramping in your lower abdomen.

If anything unusual is found, like a polyp (a potentially pre-cancerous growth), Dr. Reich can remove a piece of it or all of it using tiny instruments passed through the scope. That tissue is then sent to a lab for testing. If there is bleeding, Dr. Reich can pass special probes or inject special medicines through the scope to stop the bleeding.

The procedure takes 5 to 10 minutes.

Bleeding and perforation of the colon are possible complications of this procedure; however, such complications are rare.

Hemorrhoid Treatment

Rubber band ligation, or hemorrhoid banding, is one of the leading medical treatment options for hemorrhoids. During a hemorrhoid banding procedure, the hemorrhoid is tied at its base with rubber bands that are intended to cut the flow of blood to the hemorrhoid. As the hemorrhoid is cut off from additional blood flow it will shrink and ultimately fall off after several days. A scar will form where the hemorrhoid previously was, and this will cause all nearby veins to stay in place and avoid any future formation of a hemorrhoid in that location.

Rubber band ligation is an outpatient procedure that is performed in Dr. Reich’s office. In order to perform the hemorrhoid banding procedure, Dr. Reich may use an anoscope. The anoscope is a tool that provides your gastroenterologist with images of the problematic area while also assisting with the banding process by grasping the hemorrhoid and placing the rubber bands around the base of it.

In order for the hemorrhoid banding procedure to work properly, the rubber bands must be placed on the hemorrhoid very tightly. For many people the discomfort of the bands themselves is mild, but if you feel that they are extremely painful Dr. Reich will be able to numb the banded hemorrhoids to relieve the discomfort. Dr. Reich will be able to treat up to two hemorrhoids during a single appointment. If you have more hemorrhoids that require treatment, you will need to wait up to six weeks to allow your anal wall time to heal before repeating the procedure.